Beet and Potato Rösti

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Rödbetsrösti med potatis

Coming up with new ways of eating our beloved root vegetables is an ongoing mission for us. When eating seasonally, you definitely spend a good chunk out of the year working with onions, said root veggies and different types of cabbage family members. Variation is thus key. You would think though – after a late fall, winter and spring of doing just that – that you’d hold on to crispy summer vegetables as if life depended on it come September-October. But see, that’s not what we find ourselves feeling. Instead, we can’t wait for those trays of oven roasted root veggies. Those butternut squash soups, rutabaga and parsnip fries, potato gratins and whole roasted celery roots. Countless of times, we’ve asked each other (you’d think we had bad memory) which veggie season is our favorite – and the answer sounds about the same every time. First, we praise the sun-ripened perfect tomatoes. Then the crispy cucumbers, the beans, the Crispy Zucchini Fritters that we adore so much. But eventually, we will have made it to our love for root veggies. And there, we remain.

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Cauliflower & Corn Tacos

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Veganska blomkålstacos med majs

We’ve managed to grow our own corn this year! Wow. How we’ve been longing for fresher-than-freshest corn ever since we moved from America. You can definitely lay your hands on great corn here in Sweden too, but due to the fact that we live more than a stone’s throw away from the closest farmer’s market, we haven’t had any for two whole years. Corn season in New York is a wonderful time, and we have so many fond memories of eating ear after ear, dinner after dinner, during that precious late summer-early fall time.

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Our 6 Favorite Vegan Fall Soups

För att komma till inlägget på svenska, klicka här: Våra bästa veganska höstsoppor

Fall is here, and with it comes one of our favorite things in the world: soup season. When you strive to keep your utility bills as low as possible – and save precious energy – you spend a good amount of time being a little on the cold side during the darker 6 months of the year. In other words, soups are always very welcome around here, where fleeces and thick wool socks are our closest companions from the end of September and until spring arrives. These are some of our favorites from the archives – all bowls of wholesome, nutritious, plant based goodness, guaranteed to warm you up inside and out. Cheap, easy to make and made with seasonal ingredients – simply the way we think food should be!

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Baked Pasta with Dino Kale and Tomatoes

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Pastagratäng med svartkål och tomater

This is the second baked pasta recipe we’ve shared (the first one we called Baked Pasta with Mushrooms and Kale), and the whole concept is slowly becoming a massive favorite around here. It’s unclear why it gets us even more excited than a “regular” pasta dish, but it somehow does. Maybe the fact that it is even more a-m-a-z-i-n-g as reheated leftovers/a packed lunch? Because that would be 100% true. This is such a weeknight winner – it comes together relatively quick, makes many servings and works great for any tupperware type of adventures the next day.

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Tomato Galette

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Tomatgalette

A galette is a fuss-free kind of pie or quiche – you simply just assemble the dough, let it chill, roll it out and then fold the edges over whatever filling you have. It’s supposed to look rustic – not perfect – and thus comes with very little… well, pressure. And it’s an easy dish to adapt to the seasons, too, since the filling can really consist of any available vegetables. The crust for this recipe uses canola oil, making it both plant based and eco-friendly. Finding a high quality and organic canola oil is a good idea for anyone, but especially those eating mostly plants. With its generous amounts of omega-3s, canola oil is definitely our cooking oil of choice – and we’re discovering more and more applications as we go. We’re now baking with it (see for example our Chocolate Chunk Zucchini Bread), making galettes with it – and even whisking up some seriously yummy béchamel sauce with it (the recipe where that’s involved will be posted next week).

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Chocolate Chunk Zucchini Bread

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Zucchinibröd med choklad

Yes, yes, we’re going crazy with zucchini recipes here – but hey, the season is actually coming to an end soon! We said bye-bye to a bunch of zucchini plants a few weeks back and started spinach in that spot instead, but have kept a few for an extension to the summer. And while the production rate has dropped significantly compared to July and August, we’re still getting a few fruits every week. This keeps us more than satisfied, and it probably goes without saying that we’re pretty excited for the fall crops to ripen now, after a long summer of endless amounts of crispy cucumbers, said zucchini, chard etc. But before we welcome root veggie galore and go nuts for kale salads again, just one more way of using up the summer squash masses: zucchini bread.

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Plum Sorbet

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Plommonsorbet

While prime ice cream season might be fading away with the arrival of crispy fall weather, some of the best sorbets can actually be made with what nature has in store right now. Apples make wonderful sorbets, in case you’ve never tried that, and plums do too. We’re working with the latter here, and can’t recommend it enough. Plus, many of us (well, not us this year – so thank you neighbors) have more plums than we can possibly eat, making sorbet both an unusual and practical application, since it’ll last for a long time in the freezer. You can actually also just freeze halved and pitted plums just as they are, and then make this sorbet at a later date. We have done that, and it works great. Oh, and if you use purple or red-ish plums, you can also count on a beautiful color, adding a touch of flair to any dinner party dessert.

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Crispy Zucchini Fritters

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Frasiga zucchinibiffar

As we’re slowly making our way out of summer-break routines and feeling the creative juices come back to us, we’re also celebrating 1 year of recipe posting! Actually, yesterday marked 365 days since we shared our first ever recipe – zucchini patties – and what could be a better way of celebrating that than sharing a new and improved version of it? Last year, we harvested roughly 30 kg (66 lbs) of zucchini and turned the majority into patties/fritters. Some went into these Chocolate Zucchini Muffins (another close to inaugural recipe) and the rest was sautéed, grilled or eaten in another simple fashion. This year, we’re at 40 kg (88 lbs) and still counting. We’ve dealt with the masses in similar ways, but are also planning a big batch of zucchini bread (as in, a sweet-ish type of deal) in the next few days. If that project comes out successful, we’ll be sharing a recipe of course. However, we’re facing a very privileged problem right now: beautiful late summer weather has settled in, so we have no desire to be baking inside. Oh well.

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Cold Sesame Noodles and Green Beans

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Kalla sesamnudlar och gröna bönor

The very first meal Mike ever cooked me was an Asian-esque plate of cold sesame noodles and seared portobello mushrooms. I thought this was incredibly innovational and cool – I mean, cold noodles? I’d never heard of such a thing. It was delicious, too. Needless to say, he’d definitely passed the test.

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Simple Potato Salad with Lentils, Sugar Snaps and Basil

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Enkel potatissallad med linser, salladsärtor och basilika

Potato salads of different kinds replace soups and stews as our “clear out the fridge” meals in the summer. More or less anything can go in there, and it turns out a nutritious and delicious dish every time with some simple add-ins and flavorings. This version here is as simple as can be (although substitutions are of course encouraged) and comes together in just a little longer than the boiling time for the potatoes themselves.

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