Winter Bowl with Spelt, Chickpeas and Veggies

A bowl cooked Spelt, Chickpeas and Veggies on a wooden table

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Vinterbowl med dinkel, svartkål och morötter

To us, it’s still rather unclear what makes a bowl with food in it a bowl vs. just… well, a bowl with food in it, but what is indeed clear is that they’re kind of hip and make for beautiful Instagram pictures. The concept seems much like that of a deconstructed salad, but maybe that doesn’t sound as fancy? Either way, we figured it could be fun to make one using only local produce and skip the mango cubes and perfectly sliced avocado for more eco-friendly options – so we did!

Obviously, making a “bowl” doesn’t quite require a recipe. You basically just throw whatever you have at home in a bowl and eat it with a yummy sauce on top, but this is the formula that we find interesting and delicious at the same time. The Jerusalem artichokes could be whatever roasted root veggie you like, and feel free to replace the chickpeas with any legumes on hand. Whole spelt is a relatively new discovery for us – it’s a little chewier and nuttier than wheat berries, and makes for an excellent brown rice replacement. We can get locally grown, organic spelt at our grocery store and now consider it a new staple ingredient. Hope you’ll enjoy it as well!

Serves 4

3 dl uncooked whole spelt, soaked overnight in 6 1/2 dl water
1/2 tbsp bouillon powder (or 1/2 cube)
300 g Jerusalem artichokes
150 g dino kale
150 g red cabbage
3 medium carrots (~300 g)
4 1/2 dl cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1 dl toasted pumpkin seeds
Canola oil, salt and black pepper

Pickled red onions (optional topping but absolutely delicious)

2 medium red onions (~200 g), cut in half and then thinly sliced
1 1/2 dl white wine or apple cider vinegar (or a mix of both)
1 1/2 dl water
1 1/2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp salt
3 large garlic cloves, peeled

Sauce

2 dl sour cream, Greek yogurt or something of the like
1 1/2 dl fresh/frozen chopped parsley (~30 g)
1 tbsp mayonnaise
1/3 tsp salt
1 very small (or 1/2) garlic clove
Lots of black pepper

  1. Pickled onions Start with the pickled onions by placing the thinly sliced onions in a glass jar (any airtight, food grade container will do, but we prefer glass because it doesn’t hold smell). Choose a container that you’ll more or less fill up over one where you’ll only fill up the bottom. For this, a 5 dl/pint size jar is appropriate. In a small saucepan, stir together water, vinegar(s), salt and sugar. Add in garlic cloves and bring the mixture to a boil. Remove from the heat. Pour the hot liquid into the jar, filling up so it covers the onions entirely. Screw on a lid and allow to cool before placing it in the fridge (energy saving measure – in the winter, we always put food items to cool outside before placing them in the fridge). 
  2. Spelt Continue by preparing the spelt. After it’s been soaking overnight, bring it to a boil (using the same water and without adding any) and then turn it down to a simmer. Simmer for approx. 1 hr. Add the bouillon when about 10 min remain. The spelt is done when soft yet chewy and no water remains in the pot. Stir and set aside.
  3. Then set the oven to 200°C. Scrub the Jerusalem artichokes clean (no need to peel) and quarter them. Place them in an oven dish (preferably parchment paper covered) and then toss with a splash of canola oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Roast for about 30 min (or until soft), tossing them halfway through. Set aside when done.
  4. Move on to the dino kale. First, de-stem. Then, discard only the thickest part of the stems, and finely chop the rest of them. Roughly chop the leaves. Then either leave everything as is, or give the leaves a light “massage” with your hands until they turn darker and a little glossy. Set aside.
  5. Chop/slice the red cabbage into bite-size pieces. Set aside.
  6. With the help of a vegetable peeler, make ribbons out of the carrots. Whatever “core” is left, please snack away at 🙂
  7. Stir together chickpeas with the smallest drizzle of canola oil, a pinch of salt and some black pepper. Set aside.
  8. Whisk together all the ingredients for the sauce. If too thick to drizzle, mix in a tiny amount of water too thin. Store in the fridge until ready to serve.
  9. Time to assemble! Either arrange the components one by one so it looks all pretty, or mix everything together except the pumpkin seeds, pickled red onions and sauce. Once in a bowl, sprinkle over the seeds, scoop up some onions and then drizzle a generous amount of sauce across the top. Bon appetite!
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Jerusalem Artichoke Chips with Rosemary

För recept på svenska, klicka här: Jordärtskockschips med rosmarin

It seems appropriate to give Jerusalem artichokes a little shout out today, since we planted our first batch ever just a week or so ago. We’re very excited to see how the growing process and yield will turn out, and can’t wait to be cooking with our own homegrown funny-looking tubers in the future! For now though, organic and Swedish-grown from the store will have to do, and making your own chips with them is as easy as the outcome is scrumptious. Serving these as an appetizer definitely feels a little more sophisticated than traditional potato chips, and we can almost guarantee many would ask for the recipe. 

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Winter Lasagna

The epitome of comfort food. The indisputable superstar of hearty, filling, energy-packed meals. And probably the best leftovers ever. Enter: lasagna. In all honesty, we don’t make it too, too often but instead save it for when go on e.g. ski trips and want plenty of food prepared. This particular version got to come with us on our most recent voyage up north, and let’s just say it hit the spot like nothing else after hours and hours of skiing, a sauna session and a shower (that we were hungry for another snack just an hour later wasn’t the lasagna’s fault, but rather nature’s – if it hadn’t been so darn pretty, we wouldn’t have stayed out until sunset and thereby been a tad less famished. But hey, more nature AND double evening snacks? Bring it on).

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Winter Kale Salad

Yes, yes. Another one. But what can you do, when your garden still produces armfuls of fresh kale, despite constant sub-freezing temperatures and a decent snow cover? We throw together kale salads all the time, and only rarely do we follow any kind of recipe (not even our own, to be honest). Because kale salads are almost like those I-need-to-clear-out-the-fridge-soups – you grab whatever needs to be used up and put it all in a bowl together with massaged kale and a dressing (preferably a simple, creamy one). We usually think like this: kale – legumes – starchy vegetables – onion – something sweet – something crunchy – dressing. Use that formula, and you’ll be golden! This time, the combination looks like this: kale – chickpeas – potatoes and Jerusalem artichokes – roasted red onion – crispy apple cubes – toasted sunflower seeds – rosemary tahini dressing. I can’t really think of any combinations that wouldn’t work… except maybe roasted carrots. Or am I crazy to say that? It might be good. Yes, it probably is (I apologize, carrots).

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Jerusalem Artichoke Soup

There’s probably nothing more common to make with Jerusalem artichokes (or “sunchokes”, as they’re also called) than soup, and there’s a plethora of recipes available just a quick google search away. Nevertheless, we wanted to share our own version – or actually versions, because it seems we really can’t choose a favorite here! Anyway, let’s start from the beginning. Jerusalem artichokes are those funny looking tubers you’ll find in just about any grocery store – they’re starchy, just like potatoes, but the nutty, almost sweet flavor is not like that of any other root vegetable. They’re glorious just roasted in the oven, or sliced thin and baked into flavor bursting chips (a very sophisticated snack to welcome your dinner guests with, if we may humbly suggest so). And, of course, they’re fantastic in soup. Before we lose ourselves completely in soup galore though, a little heads up: Jerusalem artichokes contain inulin, which is a more or less indigestible form of carbohydrates that can cause… a touch of bloating. Now, the reaction is very individual – those with IBS might want to be careful with their consumption, while those with a healthy gut flora can munch away and be fine. See, inulin acts as a food source for your beneficial gut bacteria (hence the increased activity), and can therefore actually promote a happy bowel environment. And you know what? You can easily build up your tolerance for inulin, so a small bowl of soup today could mean a much bigger next week. Point is, don’t give up on Jerusalem artichokes. They’re way too delicious to be given the cold shoulder.

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